The Best Pubs Near London Train Stations

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Whether you’re waiting for a train, or have arranged to meet a friend near a mutually-handy station, you’ll want somewhere decent to get a drink. That’s why we’ve made this list of pubs near central London train stations. Every pub listed is less than a seven-minute jog from bar to platform. Some of them are on the platform.

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Paddington

If you’ve got a half an hour or so before a train departs, walk 15 minutes to the delightful Warwick Castle. Enjoy a half by the canals of Little Venice, then jog back in time for your train.

For an even swifter swift half, stay on the concourse — or, rather, a floor or two above it. Fuller’s Mad Bishop and Bear isn’t the kind of place you’d make a diversion to, but it’s perfectly good for a quickie. 

Pint to platform: one-minute jog

Marylebone

You can find a lovely pre-journey pint if you’re heading out to the Chilterns, but you’ll have to take a bit of a wander to do so. The Allsop Arms is the nearest pub to Marylebone station — barely a street away — but it’s nothing special, unfortunately while The Perseverance, two streets away, no longer operates.

For a really tasty pint, you’ll have to go a little further. The Thornbury Castle is a lovely boozer, if you’ll allow that it’s the south side of the Marylebone Road. Pints are quite expensive (as you might expect from the location) but the selection of ales is outstanding. Atmosphere and service are also beyond the call of duty. If you’ve got a knack for getting the traffic lights to turn just at the right moment, you’ll be fine. 

Pint to platform: seven-minute jog

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Euston Tap

Euston

The Euston Tap is frequently rated one of London’s best pubs — quite a compliment for a (almost) railway pub. Although it’s tiny, the beer selection is brilliant. The matching Cider Tap, in the lodge house opposite, does a similar thing for that beverage.

Pint to platform: three-minute jog

King’s Cross St Pancras 

There are two station pubs to choose from here, but Parcel Yard comes with a slightly higher recommendation than the Betjeman Arms. A Fuller’s pub, it’s got loads of space, and the beer and service are both very good. Plus, you can watch the trains depart from one of the windows if you like that sort of thing.

If you’ve got more time, you could sally up the Caledonian Road to the small but characterful King Charles I, but then you really better had leg it back — and, given how cosy that place is and what good tunes they play, you won’t want to.

Pint to platform: two-minute jog

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Moorgate

Oh dear. No wonder so many City types love to jog — they’ve probably had loads of practice pegging it from the Jugged Hare to catch the last train back to Hertfordshire. The Artillery Arms is good if you like a Guinness. But both of those are a brisk 10-minute walk from the National Rail platforms (or the same distance to Old Street, where you can usually pick your train up a minute or two after it leaves Moorgate).

But The Globe on the corner of City Road and London Wall is not bad, and is definitely the nearest pub to the station. A Nicholson’s boozer, there’s plenty of room to stand out front if it’s sunny, or you’re smoking, and it’s got two bars so service isn’t as slow as in neighbouring pubs.

Pint to platform: three-minute jog

Liverpool Street

You lucky pubgoers. There’s a busy Wetherspoon (the Hamilton Hall) right on your doorstep (a one-minute stroll to the platforms), as well as gorgeous Spitalfields pubs like The Ten Bells and the Pride of Spitalfields (both a 10-minute walk).

For somewhere nearby that’s a cut above the ‘Spoons, walk down Old Broad Street and visit The Lord Aberconway, a well-kept Nicholson’s pub that’s popular with local commuters and has a wide-ranging ale selection.

Pint to platform: two-minute jog

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Photo by psyxjaw in the Londonist Flickr pool

Fenchurch Street

The East India Arms is a cosy corner pub with a wooden interior. It’s predictably expensive but if you’ve got £4 in your pocket and half an hour before the last train to Shoebury, they do a nice pint of Whitstable Pale.

It’s closed on weekends though, in which case we recommend the Bavarian Beerhouse, which is open til 1am on Fridays and Saturdays (and still has a photo on the wall from the time Jared Hasselhoff of the Bloodhound Gang visited. Us neither.)

Pint to platform: one-minute jog

London Bridge

Pubgoing commuters are spoiled for choice at London Bridge, but The Miller and the Market Porter are both exceptional pubs in their own, very different, rights.

The Market Porter has the edge though. You can stay out all night and grab a breakfast beer until 8.30am because of its license for market traders. Great, eh? (What do you mean breakfast beer isn’t a thing?)

Pint to platform: three-minute jog (avoiding Borough Market)

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The Market Porter

Cannon Street

Grab a table at Fuller’s pub The Banker and enjoy the Thamesside views just a stone’s throw from the station.

You might also want to try a newly-opened joint called The Pelt Trader, run by the same people as the Euston Tap - but obviously there’s none of the view, and it’s City prices. It does serve pizza, though…

Pint to platform: three-minute walk (either pub)

Blackfriars

If you’re north of the Thames-spanning platform at London Blackfriars station, which you probably are, choose your pub wisely. Shaws Booksellers, whilst expensive, has loads of tables and the beer is superb. They have lovely fancy Belgian beers as well as a nice selection of wines. The famous Blackfriar pub is also worth a visit for its incredible interior.

On the south side of the Thames, the Founder’s Arms has one of the best bar-side views of the Thames in Zone 1, even if it is pig ugly on the outside.

Pint to platform: two-minute jog (either pub)

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Charing Cross

Depending on how fast you can run, you could opt for The Harp — a much lauded ale pub on Chandos Place — but if you break a sweat climbing on a bar stool, head to The Ship & Shovell. It’s lovely old pub that’s a bit quieter than anywhere on Villiers Street, and space inside to sit. It also has the distinction of being the only London pub split over two completely separate buildings. Mind that it’s closed Sundays, though.

To get to Charing Cross mainline station, run under the arches and take the stairs from Villiers Street. The four platforms will be on your left.

Pint to platform: one-minute sprint

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The Harp

Waterloo/Waterloo East

Tucked out of the way on Roupell Street near the old worker’s terraces, The King’s Arms is a brilliant pub just two streets away from Waterloo. It’s an award-winning independent with loads of real ales (some from London breweries) and it also does Thai food. The pub’s also a great alternative to the South Bank proper, if you’ve done that to death a bit.

Pint to platform: four-minute jog

Victoria

In the midst of Victoria’s hustle-bustle, there’s a wilderness of pubs. Yes, there’s a Wetherspoon on the concourse, but it’s not terribly big, and if you have to sit outside in the winter it’s freezing. Plus, no smoking area. (Not sure it has a name, either.)

Real ale fans can while away a good evening at the peerlessly stocked CASK Pub & Kitchen on Tachbrook Street but it’s a 10-minute walk into Pimlico, so probably only worth if you’re having more than one.

The Windsor Castle (formerly The Cardinal) round the back of Westminster Cathedral is a little bit nearer, and it’s Sam Smith’s. A pint of bitter here costs £2.90.

Pint to platform: five-minute jog

Where’s your favourite place to pop in for a pint before your train pulls out? Let us know in the comments. You should also probably check out our extensive London pub database.

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Lee Ufan: From Point, From Line, From Wind. Pace Gallery, London

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Until 31st October 2015, Pace London presents its first solo exhibition of work by Korean-born artist Lee Ufan. The exhibition follows Ufan’s 2014 solo exhibition at Château de Versailles. Lee Ufan is a founding member of Mono-ha (“Object School”) and mediates on gesture and nature. The artist developed seven major series throughout his career, four of which respectively titled From Point, From Line, From Winds and With Winds form the major focus of Pace London’s exhibition. This video provides you with a tour of the exhibition on the occasion of the private view and book launch on the 15th October 2015.

Lee Ufan: From Point, From Line, From Wind. Pace Gallery, London. Private view and book launch, October 15, 2015.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.

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On the market: 1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

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1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

Not too far our of Gothenburg is this rather stylish 1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden. It is on the market too.

1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

The house dates from 1961 and has obviously benefited from very sympathetic owners over the subsequent 50+ years. All the details ate still in place, with a splash of modern-day style adding something to the pot too.

1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

It is a two-storey property that looks to have been built into a hill, with the main entrance and the garage accessed from the upper level, while the main living accommodation looks out onto the garden. A good view too with all the extensive glazing too. You can also see the sea, which is in walking distance of the house if you want more.

1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

Inside is a midcentury Scandinavian dream. Bright, open plan and with all that original details either intact or in keeping.. Wood ceilings (and some walls), vintage-style kitchen (mixing original units with modern tweaks), Scandi light fittings and spiral staircase. The coolest office you will see this week too.

1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

But not a museum. There are a lot of modern touches and finishes too, adding some contemporary Scandinavian flair to the original 1960s pieces. If you can’t afford to buy it, you can use it as inspiration for your own place.

1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

In terms of the living space, a tile hall takes you into heart of the house, where you will find the open plan kitchen and living room which also offers access to the patio. There is a further living room on the ground floor and a terrace, which is where you’ll find those sea views. Upstairs from there are two bedrooms and a bathroom.

1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

There’s also a lower floor, which is accessed via the spiral staircase. That’s currently laid out with a living room and a large office that should make your time at a computer screen a joy. Also here are ‘two possible’ bedrooms, one of which accesses the garden. A laundry room and bathroom finishes things off.

1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

It’s our idea of a dream house and if it is yours, the price is 4,800,000KR, which is around £372,000.

1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

Images and details courtesy of Fastighetsbyran. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit the website.

1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden1960s architect-designed modernist property in Trollasen, Sweden

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On the market: 1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

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1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

Had a feeling this had been covered in the past, but the archives say it was a different, but similar property. It wouldn’t matter anyway, as this 1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6 has recently been refurbished, so worth a new shout regardless.

1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

The word ‘refurbished’ isn’t one we always like to see when it comes to mid-20th century modernism, but to be fair to the current owner, we are struggling to see where new starts and old ends (with the obvious exceptions) on with this Southwood House Estate property. A sympathetic job for sure.

1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

That means you can enjoy this early ‘60s design from the Andrews, Emerson, Sherlock & Keable practice without dealing with the plumbing and cooking space of the same era. No bad thing. There’s also been some rewiring and replumbing here, along with underfloor heating, upgraded glazing

1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

Anyway, the house is much the same in size, which means internal space of around 1,400 sq. ft. over its three floors. As for features, the large windows and their frames are definitely a selling point, as well as the open living spaces, the balconies, the internal doors and the original open tread staircase.

1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

Enter the house via the entrance hall (with guest cloakroom) and you’ll be met with  the open-plan kitchen and reception room, which runs from the front to the back, opening onto the garden.

1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

Head to the first floor and you’ll see a reception room at the rear and a bedroom with en-suite shower room at the front. More bedrooms are on the second floor – three in total plus a family bathroom. The master bedroom also has balcony access.

1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

The house also has a front garden with off-street parking for two cars, with  a private garden with brick paving and decking at the rear. A nice bonus leading on from there too, which is the rather lovely communal gardens.

1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

£1,495,000 is the asking price.

1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

Images and details courtesy of The Modern House. For more details and to make an enquiry, please visit their website.

1960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N61960s Harley Sherlock-designed modernist townhouse in London N6

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