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  • “a sleazy peep show about tits and bums gussied up w high production values and clever dialogue” sums up “Game of Thrones”.
  • Indirectly you have to give credit to Rupert Murdoch’s media empire for financing the sterling work of The Sunday Times’ exposure of FIFA.
  • FIFA refuses to disclose Sepp Blatter’s “multimillion-euro” salary according to The Sunday Times. FIFA’s salaries should be transparent.
  • #nowreading FIFA files The Sunday Times. Opaque plastic behind thick blinds, bungs, Goodfellas and that man Blatter. http://t.co/0QZOVozbZS

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  • That’s Park Hill (in Croydon) according to an old Wates booklet - https://t.co/S2Qru6F389
  • «The first attempt in
    the mid-20th century to create
    an environment comparable to
    the village-in-a-town of the 18th
    and 19th centuries».
  • From now on I’ll just have to carry two tube maps: one with overcrowding and one without.
  • I’ve stocked up on the old tube maps on last year’s advice from (or it might have been ).
  • http://t.co/EFR0c1FIQB “Whatever this new map was, it’s no longer a design classic.» via
  • New tube map, with clock cover and extra Overground http://t.co/1MXsYShtm4
  • https://t.co/Y7a2FU8mHq Danish Broadcasting’s home page for the show, that sweet spot between «Grand Designs» and “£100K house».
  • Give ’s fine show subtitles or maybe create a British version of you can get British architects to open their homes.
  • The Danish (and by extension the Norwegian version) of «The Architect’s Home» would be nice for a late night slot on BBC4.
  • A Septic Bladder bathed in new age mush or whatever it is we believe in. But he has been re-elected. This is how democracy works.
  • A holy relic https://t.co/nWNEWvp2Tf
  • or just plonk it in front of the screen, the stone cold classic that is “Steve McQueen”. http://t.co/9mjRoTgwgS
  • Sepp Blatter: a new-age priest from another planet. Everything is OK, I just want to be with you all and share my love (+some sponsor money)
  • #nowplaying Spare beauty, one of the finest ambient albums created. John Foxx and Harold Budd: “Translucence + Drif… http://t.co/SiwcoSdm5t

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The Time Out Guide to the new London Overground

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The Time Out Guide to the new London Overground (Exclusive)

The extension of the Overground this weekend will open up fresh areas of London that previously didn’t exist. Entire new social playgrounds will be unlocked, brimming with retail, cocktail and clubbing possibilities, and all because there are now orange trains from somewhere central every quarter of an hour or so. Here then are ten places we’d never heard of before, but which are now our favourite special recommendations on the fast train to Party Central. London Overground, we salute you!

Cambridge Heath
bwaymkt.jpgFor Varsity-themed entertainment, this vibrant London suburb has much to commend itself. College types love to mingle with the smart set in the hub zone by the crossroads, perhaps getting their bicycle fixed at Figarude or picking up vintage bargains at Frockney Rebel. As a bonus Hackney Road is widely known for its handbag wholesalers, which we think you’re going to love, offering a multiplicity of top deals on unique, hand-crafted, capacious accessories. Or simply stop off in the shadow of the famous Mare Street gasholders, arabica bean latte in hand, and soak in the edgy vibe.

London Fields
Just three stops out of Liverpool Street, this newly-created neighbourhood boasts a truly pastoral attitude to life. Hackney’s London Fields are a tree-lined Elysian expanse spread out beneath the railway viaduct, featuring a wild flower meadow and a conveniently located set of public lavatories. Create a splash by stripping off at the Lido, or drop into the railway arches for nutritious sourdough, seeded rye or rugbrøt from the E5 Bakehouse. If you’re feeling adventurous, a short stroll takes you to Broadway Market, a canalside shopping parade whose bohemian schtick and streetwares are, we think, about to become very popular.

Rectory Road
Rectory Road’s semi-rural platforms deliver you deep into unspoilt suburbia. There’s space in the elongated ticket hall for a organic kiosk, or dry-cleaning pop-up, whose imminent appearance surely can’t be too far away. Residents buy their exotic fruit and comestibles from the excellently-named Local Express, a veritable bazaar of global goods, while weekend entertainment is provided by the United Reformed Church on the corner of Evering Road, whose Vision4Life sessions are ever-popular with young and old alike. Coffee shops are in short supply hereabouts, however, so best buy your flat white at Liverpool Street and bring it with you.

bgrove.jpgBruce Grove
In its commanding location on the High Road, this must-visit location truly delivers. If it’s gold you’re after, family-owned Erbiller Jewellers will buy your stash in any condition, while nextdoor at Shoe Zone the ‘£3 off’ summer deal on sandals is going down a storm. Those in the know, however, are to be found picking over the exclusive vegetables outside the Bruce Grove Supermarket & Meat Market, or getting makeover tips from the adjacent Cosmetics outlet while soft reggae gently plays. Turn up on the right day and you can look round Bruce Castle Museum in the park at the end of the road, although it’s not actually a castle, and they don’t appear to have a cafe, so maybe don’t bother.

Silver Street
Even the name reeks of wealth and luxury. Lovers of bling should make tracks to the banks of the North Circular, if not to rifle through the trinkets round the back of Lidl, then at least to take a selfie of themselves in front of the station sign. But we recommend a trip across the railings to Pymmes Park, for what else, but a jug of the finest fruit-topped alcoholic beverage. The bar at the boarded-up Pymmes Park Inn will we’re sure be reopening soon, for what must be a well-deserved makeover, and if not then at least it’ll make some lovely two-bed apartments you can move into later.

Bush Hill Park
One stop before somewhere called Enfield, this overlooked suburban enclave is preparing for a rush of visitors. Staff at the Sainsbury’s Local by the station await the discerning shopper, while the turreted Bush Hill Park Hotel has several pumps of branded lagers ready and waiting. One offer that’s sure to be popular is at the B-Chic Hair & Beauty Boutique, where a cut and finish with Alberto is only £10 (terms and conditions apply). But to fully grasp the area’s beating green heart head north to the open space of Bush Hill Park, whose lengthy horse chestnut avenue is the equal of any to be seen elsewhere in London.

Turkey Street
blessedl.jpgAlmost on the edge of the capital, if such a place exists, this former country lane leads west from the renowned Freezywater Shopping Centre. Here the Squirrel House Chinese takeaway features a menu full of surprises, the Blessed Launderette offers a devoted while-you-wait ironing service, and the Cyprus Corner Meze Bar rightly proclaims ‘Welcome to Tasty’. If foodies can ever tear themselves away, the delights of the Turkey Brook linear park await. This minor streamlet tracks the roadside for almost quarter of a mile to the Gateway Open Space, where a sculpture of an amphibian-topped egg can be freely photographed. Weary visitors can then retreat to the First Choice Off Licence for some much needed refreshment.

Wood Street
If it’s cosmopolitan chic you crave, then a sojourn in E17’s Wood Street might be enough to recharge your retail batteries. Untroubled by high street chains, its independent stores offer a wider range of lifestyle options for the kitchen cupboard, mantlepiece or shed. Agombar’s quality shoes rarely disappoint, while few craft icing quite so stylishly as Wood Street Market’s bespoke cake artist. Don’t miss the amazing Mural of Fictional History at the top of the street, while for sheer architectural panache, the bleak windswept concrete blocks snaking between the Co-op and the Post Office are hard to beat.

Highams Park
Lurking unnoticed on the Chingford borders, Highams Park exists within a dapper bubble of gentility that few have ever pierced. The first evidence of culture is Not Quite The End of the Line, a pop-up shop on the southbound platform which sells penny sweets and handmade vintage greetings cards in aid of the Highams Park Society. Other bijou outlets clustered around the iconic level crossing include The Village Florist, everybody’s favourite V&A Books and Gifts, and the TOWIE-friendly Fakin’ It tanning salon. Only your own recreational inertia is preventing you from making tracks to this unique and on-trend urban village.

Emerson Park
Apparently this station lurks somewhere between Romford and Upminster, but we at Time Out have never reported on anything east of Barking and we have no intention of starting now. A friend’s gran told us there’s a chippie called Oh My Cod! at the top of the ramp, and a neighbouring shop that sells Fireplaces and Stoves, but they sound ghastly and we certainly won’t be visiting any time soon. If you have the misfortune to live out here in this godforsaken wasteland, our apologies, and we hope you get the disposable income together to move somewhere more achingly hip as soon as possible.

Next week, we retreat to Camden, Peckham, Hoxton and Clapham, as per usual.

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In Praise Of Croydon

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Croydon

Poor Croydon — the butt of jokes, a byword for the architectural ruining of a town, maligned by Bromley-ite David Bowie, a cliche for the lazy writer — akin to ‘Peckham is Only Fools And Horses‘.

Anyone who’s been there won’t need us to tell them that all that is far from the mark. Far better to consider the suburb’s famous sons and daughters: Bridget Riley; Sam Taylor-Johnson; Samuel Coleridge Taylor; Kirsty MacColl; the alumni of Croydon College of Art, such as Ray Davies, Malcolm McLaren, Jamie Reid, Mervyn Peake, Noel Fielding, Kate Moss and FKA Twigs.

Further, it was the birthplace of dubstep, is a cracking place to walk around, somewhere you can play dragon mini golf, has a dazzling array of places to eat and drink… we could go on.

And that is exactly what authors John Grindrod (Concretopia), Andy Miller (The Year Of Reading Dangerously) and Bob Stanley (also Saint Etienne’s keyboard player) will be doing. The trio will be considering the virtues of the environs of 2009’s Greenest Large City in two evenings of readings, debate and celebration of suburbia, covering books, films, music, buildings and art.

All three have a close association with Croydon — it has influenced their writing, and the way they see the world — so expect a love-in about the Fairfield Halls, the Beano record shop (RIP), the Whitgift Centre, Lunar House, and even the New Addington estate.

Up yours, Bowie.

Croydon Til I Die takes place on 28 May at Rough Trade East, Shoreditch, at 7pm and 11 June at Fairfield Halls, Croydon, at 7pm. Entry is free.

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Croydon underpass construction showing landmark buildings, 1964 – archive video

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A video from Film London London’s Screen Archives and the Museum of Croydon shows the construction of the Croydon underpass in 1964. The film includes footage of the Nestlé Tower and the iconic blue wall of a venue called The Greyhound, famous for hosting artists such as David Bowie and Roxy Music. To watch the video in full and read more about Croydon’s development, click here Continue reading…mf.gif

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Troublemakers

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With Land Art being one of my favorite mediums, I am really looking forward to the release of this film.

Visit entry to view embedded video.

Troublemakers unearths the history of land art in the tumultuous late 1960s and early 1970s. The film features a cadre of renegade New York artists that sought to transcend the limitations of painting and sculpture by producing earthworks on a monumental scale in the desolate desert spaces of the American southwest. Today these works remain impressive not only for the sheer audacity of their makers but also for their out-sized ambitions to break free from traditional norms. The film casts these artists in a heroic light, which is exactly how they saw themselves. Iconoclasts who changed the landscape of art forever, these revolutionary, antagonistic creatives risked their careers on radical artistic change and experimentation, and took on the establishment to produce art on their own terms. The film includes rare footage and interviews which unveil the enigmatic lives and careers of storied artists Robert Smithson (Spiral Jetty), Walter De Maria (The Lightning Field) and Michael Heizer (Double Negative); a headstrong troika that established the genre. As the film makes clear, in making works that can never be possessed as an object in a gallery, these troublemakers stand in marked contrast to the hyper-speculative contemporary art world of today.

Troublemakers points out that land art was rife with contradiction and conflict, a site where architecture, landscape, sculpture, technology, archaeology and photography would all converge. Against the backdrop of the Vietnam War, Cold War anxieties and other political uncertainties of the nuclear age, land artists often subscribed to a dystopian view of the future that questioned the military-industrial complex, consumerism and the banalities of modern life and culture.

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Kengo Kuma’s Toshima Ward Office is a New Kind of High-Rise

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kengo-kuma-toshima-ward-office-00-600x36

Toshima Ward Office is an urban redevelopment project conceived by Japanese architecture firm Kengo Kuma and Associates. The panel-clad structure houses an office building, permanent living accommodations, and a vertical garden inside its massive interior. Similar to a tree, the building features a trifecta of panels that adjust to the environment. Recycled wooden louvers offer shade to internal spaces, solar panels provide supplementary electricity to the units, and vegetated green panels produce an outdoor space that visitors can frequent year round.

The post Kengo Kuma’s Toshima Ward Office is a New Kind of High-Rise appeared first on Highsnobiety.

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  • FIFA officials face penalties, then possibly extra-time.
  • Arrested FIFA officials face extradition to U.S.: NY Times http://t.co/2WjK0PxJLM
  • Danish Broadcasting’s “Arkitektens Hjem” (“The Architect’s Home”) are available for streaming - https://t.co/J0hVqoQnBx Subtitled in Danish

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  • The price of an artificial-meat hamburger has apparently dropped from $325,000 in 2013 to $11 now: http://t.co/6eQ0PireiR
  • ie a tap or shower should make it obvious how to regulate temperature or pressure, minimalism is only good if operation of device is obvious
  • “Good Design Makes A Product Understandable”. Why do so many (from showers to tech) designers decide to break this simple rule?
  • 10 Edicts of Functional Design by Dieter Rams http://t.co/BbLaBkDhV8 via “Good Design Makes A Product Understandable”

10 Edicts of Functional Design by Dieter Rams

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We’ve revisited the work of pioneering Functionalist designer Dieter Rams (Braun, Vitsoe) more than we care to admit, but we’ve never before explicitly laid out his “10 principles of Good Design.” To truly understand the timeless nature of Rams’ work, and the extensive influence his function-focused ideology has had on the realms of art and design, we thought it necessary to first explore the guidelines Rams’ set for himself. For many aspiring designers, Rams’ rules are like the Hammurabi’s code of the creative field — edicts to live and create by.

1. Good Design Is Innovative: The possibilities for innovation are not, by any means, exhausted. Technological development is always offering new opportunities for innovative design. But innovative design always develops in tandem with innovative technology, and can never be an end in itself.

2. Good Design Makes a Product Useful: A product is bought to be used. It has to satisfy certain criteria, not only functional but also psychological and aesthetic. Good design emphasizes the usefulness of a product while disregarding anything that could possibly detract from it.

3. Good Design Is Aesthetic: The aesthetic quality of a product is integral to its usefulness because products are used every day and have an effect on people and their well-being. Only well-executed objects can be beautiful.

4. Good Design Makes A Product Understandable: It clarifies the product’s structure. Better still, it can make the product clearly express its function by making use of the user’s intuition. At best, it is self-explanatory.

5. Good Design Is Unobtrusive: Products fulfilling a purpose are like tools. They are neither decorative objects nor works of art. Their design should therefore be both neutral and restrained, to leave room for the user’s self-expression.

6. Good Design Is Honest: It does not make a product more innovative, powerful or valuable than it really is. It does not attempt to manipulate the consumer with promises that cannot be kept.

7. Good Design Is Long-lasting: It avoids being fashionable and therefore never appears antiquated. Unlike fashionable design, it lasts many years – even in today’s throwaway society.

8. Good Design Is Thorough Down to the Last Detail: Nothing must be arbitrary or left to chance. Care and accuracy in the design process show respect toward the consumer.

9. Good Design Is Environmentally Friendly: Design makes an important contribution to the preservation of the environment. It conserves resources and minimizes physical and visual pollution throughout the lifecycle of the product.

10. Good Design Is as Little Design as Possible: Less, but better – because it concentrates on the essential aspects, and the products are not burdened with non-essentials; back to purity, back to simplicity.

In today’s overcrowded metropolises, and in the age of information overload, Functionalist theory remains as relevant as ever before. Simplicity, productivity and timelessness are at the core of Rams’ guiding principles; all three are things that will never lose value in our ever-changing world. 

The post 10 Edicts of Functional Design by Dieter Rams appeared first on Selectism.

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  • The Bling Ring (2013) - http://t.co/kFwSIOdymp 3* seems right for this lightweight exposure of lightweight Hollywood criminals.
  • “Every dystopian society has excessive surveillance but now we see even western democracies like the US and England moving that way”
  • “Philip Zimmermann: king of encryption reveals his fears for privacy” (Guardian). PZ emigrating to Switzerland. http://t.co/HV2F0XNXwf
  • “Google patents ‘creepy’ internet toys to run the home”. Hang on, this “patent” was seen as early as “Bladerunner”. http://t.co/GdA1TFtyDg

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  • “Agnes Martin: the artist mystic who disappeared into the desert”. Looking forward to this major at The Tate Modern. http://t.co/Y3zrmArnMk
  • The Detectives, BBC2: A brilliantly bleak tale of blank-faced detectives in stark urban settings http://t.co/isByGq1U7j (Independent).
  • The Detectives E01-E03. 5* police documentary, pleased to see the BBC licence fee being put to good use.
  • The Detectives – review: the level of access makes for essential viewing http://t.co/ifetBg0xPD (Guardian).
  • The Detectives, Manhunt, episode 1, review: ‘brilliant’ - via http://t.co/zRjLYWC7mU It really is a 5* doc series.
  • Not sure what happened to Mad Men on its journey, the journey started so promisingly.
  • Mad Men S07E08-E14. E12 pick of the bunch. My hopes for Peggy Olson spin-off killed off. The lift MM’s signature spot, like Simpson’s sofa.
  • “Amazon to begin paying corporation tax on UK retail sales”. Nice of Amz, nice for Osborne and nice for us consumers: http://t.co/M0LpxjPlk1

Carl Hansen & Søn opens showroom in London’s Clerkenwell

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Clerkenwell Design Week 2015: Danish brand Carl Hansen & Son has opened a space in London’s Clerkenwell to showcase furniture by mid-century designers Hans J Wegner, Kaare Klint and Poul Kjaerholm (+ slideshow). (more…)

dezeen?d=yIl2AUoC8zA dezeen?i=3czoNo1p3-U:L1yhruvnTEs:V_sGLiP dezeen?i=3czoNo1p3-U:L1yhruvnTEs:gIN9vFw dezeen?i=3czoNo1p3-U:L1yhruvnTEs:D7DqB2p dezeen?d=qj6IDK7rITs

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  • Pretty obvious, but maybe a big bad Google-branded report make people stop people giving real answers to stupid “security” questions
  • “City of birth? Why password questions are a terrible idea”. Don’t ever submit real answers to DoB, maiden names etc http://t.co/zemtoVaQmy

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Daily Digest for May 21st

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lastfm (feed #14)
Listened to The Hunter - Slaves.
lastfm (feed #14)
lastfm (feed #14)
lastfm (feed #14)
lastfm (feed #14)
Listened to Hey - Slaves.
lastfm (feed #14)

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  • New version of eWallet for Mac seems to be “dialling home” on startup (crashlytics, AWS). Please make this optional.
  • that’s from http://t.co/WwEedBwNwr and “kept 300 snails as loyal pets at her home in Suffolk … said to have been drawn to their androgyny”
  • Patricia Highsmith: “scandalised … party by opening her handbag to display a head of lettuce and 100 of molluscs munching happily on it”
  • #NowPlaying “Wurds” by Bernard + Edith from “Jem”. For fans of 80/90s 4AD records.
  • Penthouse gym, will it be full of Playboys?
  • Free business idea: a tax paying, ethical, fair trade and green online advertising company. Bundle a search engine and take on the world.
  • DEA, Amtrak, and Civil-Asset Forfeiture. http://t.co/UzorUOj1WU
  • Australia forces UberX drivers to become tax collectors http://t.co/FouH9LfMGI via Australia takes the lead on tax(i) dodgers

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  • Blocking mobile adverts just became that little bit easier http://t.co/6fkdJO2qPH via The sooner it becomes reality the better.
  • Free business idea: “App Store Blocker” - an app that locks all attempts by websites to put you in the App Store or simply blocks mobile ads
  • EZTV torrents no longer safe according to Engadget (no link as Engadget uses those damn half-hidden App Store links).
  • 99% of my “clickthroughs” from mobile web adverts are false. Miss out by a few millimetres on the screen and I end up in the app store.
  • More ‘Mad Max’ is coming, confirms director George Miller http://t.co/VOCTmpX6Ne via
  • BBC News - One in five Southern trains ‘late’, rail regulator says http://t.co/BSKIinaxKx Well there’s a shock.
  • Irony: FIFA to protect freedom of the press in Qatar according to the BBC. Does that include The Sunday Times, FIFA?
  • #NowPlaying “Rival Dealer” by Burial
  • grep -iv madmen

How to Make a Self-Shot Video Look and Sound Good—On the Cheap

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I’ve just watched the umpteenth Kickstarter video with crappy sound and that awkward-designer-mumbles-towards-the-camera production value. Folks, come on—when trying to verbally communicate the value of something, audio is important, and it’s not all that hard (nor expensive) to get right.

NYC-based photographer Michael Cinquino has started up an initiative called “Monetize Your Content on Camera,” whereby he’ll release a series of video tips online to help you get your message out there in a professional way. Kicking off the series is this video, which should come in handy whether you’re developing a crowdfunding pitch or starting a YouTube channel to share your design knowledge and tips.

https://vimeo.com/127846966

How To Put Yourself On HD Video For Less Than $80 from Michael Cinquino on Vimeo.

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  • Girlhood II will be filmed in the suburbs of London suburb Croydon.
  • Croydon just might be a dangerous place, seen that viral video of a violent young girl smacking boy in one of Croydon’s ‘banlieues’.
  • “not yet known if Croydon will be used for any of the filming” - well keep me informed and I’ll work for free as an extra.
  • Nicole Kidman set to star in film in which Croydon is the ‘most dangerous place in the universe’ http://t.co/vNjZqjUHR8 via
  • Evening Standard celebrating (not a hint of criticism) Qatari takeover of Mayfair, this while BBC crew gets arrested in Quatar
  • UK government quietly rewrites hacking laws to give GCHQ immunity http://t.co/ZeQLmU2jWJ
  • “Aging has been around for a long time”, British biologist Aubrey de Grey in ST. His aim to “cure” the “engineering fault” that is aging.
  • So bless Gordon Brown?
  • What seems rife back home in Norway is former MPs of all colours moving into lobbying and PR firms after “leaving” politics.
  • Although it seems a bit more calcified here in the UK, it’s a problem back in the old country (Norway) as well.
  • so I think Steve Hilton is at least correct on that account. Powerful people (like football managers) don’t have a hard time finding a job.
  • John Sawers “been appointed non-executive director” at BP. Sawers spent “36 years working for the government”, “five years as head of MI6”
  • George Osborne’s “leading economic adviser” Rupert Harrison is in talks to join BlackRock, “world’s biggest money manager”.
  • Business secretary Sajid Javid “faces an unwelcome reminder as a highly paid investment banker” (Deutsche Bank).
  • Amber Reed (the new energy secretary) is the former wife of hack Sunday Times hack AA Gill.
  • Steve Hilton writes in The Sunday Times (20150517). In the same issue we can read that:
  • “corporate bosses, the MPs, the journalists … an insular ruling class develops … flit&float between Westminster, Whitehall and the City”
  • #NowPlaying http://t.co/573wUg32SP
  • Even if owned by the Murdoch, I doubt there’s a finer newspaper than The Sunday Times.
  • Hugh McIlvanney talking sense again in The Sunday Times” and putting the great (player, if not columnist) Graeme Souness in place.
  • ‘Plainly, Messi deserves to be bracketed with Maradona, and with such as Pele and Alfredo di Stefano. But “streets ahead”? Never.’
  • BBC News - OECD attacks ‘aggressive’ tech tax plans http://t.co/WgLtYUCd6U Tech companies “push the boundaries of what is legal”“
  • Steve Hilton married to a Google VP, but undoubtedly his own man. Must be weird being married to VP of one of world’s leading tax dodgers,
  • so the Dalai Lama and former Cameron adviser Steve Hilton almost singing from the same hymn sheet.
  • and “Power is more important and on top of power, economy is more important” the Dalai Lama said according to the Sunday Times.
  • UK gov and China-relations: sometimes “not adequate stand firm on about principles, democracy, freedom of religion & individuals”
  • Conspiracy deepens as suspected pro-Putin assassin Ruslan Geremeyev flees Russia http://t.co/1eeXk2kUqk via “a coverup from the top”
  • in an article on “An Erotic History of Versailles”.
  • “When her [Mdm de Pompadour] bloom faded she became the king’s [Louis XV] pimp, keeping him supplied with a stream of virgins”. Mat Campbell

How to Make Lock Picks Out of Common Household Items

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZB2jE9euVPk?version=3&rel=0&fs=1&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent&w=500&h=281

This short video might blow your mind.

Using household items like paper clips or toothbrushes, you can easily defeat 70-80% of the padlocks out in the world.

The teacher is Kevin Reeve of OnPoint Tactical. Kevin has trained and consulted for the FBI, Secret Service, SWAT, and elite military units like Marine Force Recon, SEAL Team 6, etc.

He was also my teacher for the “Urban Escape and Evasion” episode of The Tim Ferriss Experiment, which is currently the #1 non-fiction TV show across all of iTunes.

In that episode, Kevin teaches me (and therefore you):

  • How to escape common restraints like zip ties and handcuffs.
  • How to “borrow” cars in emergency situations.
  • Effective evasion tactics for urban environments (e.g. parking garages, fast appearance changes, etc.).
  • And much more…

I get restrained, hooded, thrown in a trunk, and subjected to other abuse. My (least) favorite part was getting stun gunned while temporarily blinded. Surprise, Ferriss!

If you’ve ever fantasized about being Jason Bourne — or simply being ready for anything — the entire episode is full of effective and easy-to-learn techniques.

I suggest getting the “Season Pass” for $14.99 or so, which gets you all 13 episodes for ~40% off, plus hours of bonus footage. Many of you have said that the bonus footage alone is worth more than the $15.

MORE ON THE TV SHOW

Bestselling author Tim Ferriss (“The world’s best human guinea pig.” – Newsweek) pushes himself to the breaking point, attempting to learn notoriously punishing skills–surfing, parkour, professional poker, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, online dating (Ha!), learning languages, etc.—in just one week each. Filmed and edited by the same team behind Anthony Bourdain’s hit shows (Zero Point Zero).

In every episode of The Tim Ferriss Experiment, Ferriss partners with the world’s best and most unorthodox teachers (Laird Hamilton, Marcelo Garcia, Stewart Copeland, etc.), who train him for a final gauntlet. Shocking breakthroughs, injuries, epiphanies, and disasters ensue. In cases where he succeeds, Tim shows you how to replicate his results. The mantra of the show is “you don’t need to be superhuman to get superhuman results…you just need a better toolkit.”

Enjoy!

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Time capsule for sale: 1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

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1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

Thanks to Su for flagging this one up. The house was briefly on the market a few months back, but went under offer before we had chance to write about it. But that sale doesn’t look to have gone through, as this 1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire is back up for sale.

1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

It’s an amazing place, although you do wonder if the house will survive in this state for much longer. The 1960s individually architect-designed house is a time capsule for the era, with hardly a thing changed in the intervening 50 or so years.

1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

The sought after period features are everywhere. From the open plan living area to the distinctive stairway, the gallery, the exposed brick, the wood panelling, the light fittings, the built-on storage…even the upstairs carpet and the kitchen units. It’s as if the house has been trapped in time for decades. Which is nothing but good news for lovers of the era.

1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

However, there is that ominous mention of ‘scope for further development’ subject to planning permission. Of course, the agent is absolutely right for mentioning it, especially as the house isn’t listed and does have what looks like a good sized plot. But we would hope that someone loves this place for what it is and preserves what you really cannot get back.

1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

In terms of the living space, you are looking at a ‘spacious’ entrance hall, a walk-in store room (or dark room) and that wonderful period kitchen, which in turn leads to the stunning L-shaped open plan living and dining room with exposed brick and open tread stairway. The dining room has fitted seating and and a door to the rear.

1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

Note that there is also a ground floor bedroom, which has built-in storage and an interconnecting door to a bathroom.

1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

Head up to the first floor and you’ll find a further bedroom, specifically a galleried bedroom with built-in wardrobe, large internal window and a door to balcony. Also on this floor is a store room with window.

1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

Head outside and you’ll notice the large corner plot with driveway parking, car port, inner courtyard area plus side and rear gardens measuring 90ft x 90ft.

1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

It is unlikely to be on the market for long. If you want it, offers in excess of £350,000 are advised.

Images and details courtesy of Hockeys. For more information and to make enquiries, please visit their website.

1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire1960s modernist property in Dry Drayton, Cambridgeshire

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  • - Calvary
    2) sculptured representation of the Crucifixion, usually erected in the open air
    3) experience or occasion of extreme suffering
  • Definition of calvary: http://t.co/FKJAd4bkwg As used by Adam Boulton (quoting Jonathan Powell) in today’s Sunday Times.
  • So maybe put a levy on all computers, tablets or mobiles in UK and/or add a licence number unlock for iPlayer on all platforms.
  • 1000 households a day opting out paying of BBC licence fee, since they don’t own a TV. Most still watching through iPlayer on other devices.
  • on EU parliament and commission. Some strong advice from Hilton on paying a living wage for all to Cameron as well. No word on Google-tax.
  • “a vast, stinking cesspit of corporate corruption gussied up in the garb of idealistic internationalism”, former adviser to PM Steve Hilton
  • So if you are ever “offered” a polygraph interview, then at the start simply state that you don’t believe the polygraph to be infallible.
  • in other words: US police and gov agencies (allowed to use polygraphs for employee interviews) don’t want to hire people that read papers?
  • Times has the story as well: “it is considered essential that those who take it believe it is infallible in order for it to be effective”.
  • http://t.co/RS7U261yrU owner pleads guilty to helping others beat lie detector http://t.co/uL9AJEmTCd via

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  • Gorgeus for a late night sesson: Turkish folk meets modern Norwegian jazz. ♫ http://t.co/qgseH5r81x
  • PRIVATHAUS HENRIETTE SALVESEN http://t.co/2xFFwunSXG via
  • Arkitektens hjem (The Architect’s Home) http://t.co/HCSK2cHlMw … Norwegian version E05 Henriette Salvesen. My favourite episode so far.
  • thx anyways for a great service (4*) and for “Youth of the Beast”. More like that please.
  • so it should be fairly trivial to implement get subtitles/SDH in (if the media you import from allow/support it).
  • iPlayer can do native subtitles on/off quite elegantly with a switch, Danish Radio simply does two separate streams, so …
  • Arkitektens hjem (The Architect’s Home) http://t.co/HCSK2cpKnW Norwegian version E05 Charlotte Thiis-Evensen, a social democratic architect
  • #Croydon Till I Die: taking the suburbs to the nation http://t.co/6hljGz8lXJ
  • How one of the world’s biggest investors [Norway’s oil pension fund] might help you keep your job http://t.co/RdONRaaeE2 via
  • #nowplayinghttp://t.co/jBg77elkG3
  • this looks special (via kottk) , even for those of us that have left football (mostly) behind http://t.co/NiBB0HK53j
  • The meticulous handwritten pre-match notes used by football commentator Nick Barnes http://t.co/4XdZElZPv3
  • Tractacus - Tibor Szemzö 1/4 https://t.co/Htmoerk0Aw via

Football commentary cheat sheets

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Nick Barnes is a football commentator for BBC Radio Newcastle. For each match he does, Barnes dedicates two pages in his notebook for pre-match notes, lineups, player stats, match stats, and dozens of other little tidbits.

Nick Barnes

Nick Barnes

Wonderful folk infographics. NBC commentator Arlo White also shared his pre-match notes. Both men say they barely use the notes during the match…by the time the notes are done, they know the stuff. (via @dens)

Tags: Arlo White   design   infoviz   Nick Barnes   soccer   sports

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The Tribe review – one of the most disturbing films of the year

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Squeaking shoes and grunts of anger are the only soundtrack to this brutal and supremely strange Ukrainian film about a school for the deaf falling into anarchy

I can’t stop thinking about this film. Gimmicky, maybe, but brutally confident and powerful, and encased in its own miasma of strangeness. The Tribe is by the 41-year-old Ukrainian writer-director Miroslav Slaboshpitsky. It was first aired at last year’s Cannes, and then at the London film festival, where its avant-garde reputation went before it, and audiences assembled in the spirit of those attending the performance of an undiscovered text by Samuel Beckett, or a new classical stage production by Tim Supple. It went to Canada and the US, and there was a public controversy in Ukraine when it wasn’t chosen as that country’s Oscar entry for best foreign film. Now The Tribe has a general release here, and UK film-goers up for a challenge can savour it: a silent movie, of a kind, at once brutally explicit and mysteriously opaque: a study of abuse, an essay in loneliness, a political allegory.

Related: The Tribe: a signed story of sex and violence in a deaf school

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Mad Max: Fury Road review – extravagantly bizarre and noisy

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The legendary Aussie post-apocalyptic road warrior rides again – as deranged and over-the-top as ever

That adjective in the title is accurate. Extravagantly deranged, ear-splittingly cacophonous and entirely over-the-top: the Mad Max punk western franchise has been revived as a bizarre convoy-chase action-thriller in the post-apocalyptic desert. It’s like Grand Theft Auto revamped by Hieronymus Bosch, with a dab of Robert Rodriguez’s From Dusk Till Dawn on the side. Tom Hardy plays Max Rockatansky, the former interceptor lawman: Max is a lone wolf, a survivor of the global catastrophe that has made oil, water and bullets rare commodities. He is captured by hateful chieftain Immortan Joe (played by Mad Max veteran Hugh Keays-Byrne) and taken to his citadel, where Joe warlords it over an oppressed populace by controlling the water supply, and by bizarrely supplementing their fluid intake with industrial quantities of mother’s milk, farmed from imprisoned pregnant women. Max is fated to escape with another rebel – the one-armed Imperator Furiosa, played with glittery-eyed panache by Charlize Theron. She takes with her an improbable phalanx of scantily clothed young women, the “breeders” that the hateful patriarch wishes to make the mothers of his children: they look as if they are heading for an edgy Australian Vogue photoshoot. Max is impassive, to say the least: the nearest Hardy’s Max comes to an emotional outburst is when one of the women does something very brave while hanging on to the side of the truck. Max gives her a little smile and boyish thumbs-up. It’s the Mad Max equivalent of hugging her and declaiming: “Darling, your courage is magnificent.” Everything looks churned and charred: the heat and dryness have turned everyone mad, like Max. As someone says: “Do not become addicted to water; it will take hold of you and you will resent its absence.” It could be a poster tagline for this entirely demented film.

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  • or doors closing 30 secs before the train left? so train can leave on time, leaving us behind
  • How To Start Your Own Art Collection Without Breaking The Bank | Londonist http://t.co/mjCOxOvekf via
  • “Please note that you may experience a delay in us responding to your [delay repay] claim due to current high volumes” Irony? thx
  • : #lostshoe #lonelysole #3 Near East Croydon station 20150513 http://t.co/t7VUZTkm9s

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Meet the 15-year-old behind Recens Paper who’s ready to take over the world

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Recens-itsnicethat-list-2

When I was 15 years old I was getting drunk on Bacardi Breezers by the beach huts and caking myself in Impulse body sprays to try to cover up the smell of smoke from a crafty fag on the way home from school. I definitely was not launching an independent magazine, formulated in response to the oppressive perfectionism of mainstream media. But that’s because I’m not Elise By Olsen.

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Where Is All of Your Time Going?

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By Fabian Oefner

In the 1930 publication, Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren, John Maynard Keynes, the renowned economist, predicted that our millennial generation would be working “three-hour shifts” or a “fifteen-hour week.” Now that the future is here, it’s safe to say that we’re working longer and harder than ever to meet the competitive challenges of today’s workplace, and we can’t seem catch our breath during the frantic daily grind.

According to a recent poll, the working week in the United States is almost a full working day longer than average. It’s no better internationally: in Turkey, nearly half the population works more than 50 hours per week. If we are to ever regain control of our work week, we need to better understand where our time goes.

Jackie Bavaro, Product Manager at Asana, recently shared her insights on how to master one’s time. She outlined a simple way to assess how we’re spending our time. Make two pie charts: one showing how you want to spend your time and another showing how you’re actually spending your time. Open a spreadsheet, and list out your weekly activities until they total 168 hours (the total time allocated to you each week). Create 3 columns:

  1. Activity — Now list the following items under this heading: Sleep, Physical Fitness, Eating/Cooking/Groceries, Work/Career, Watching TV/Internet Surfing/Video Games, Miscellaneous (Errands, House Cleaning, etc.), Family/Friends, Self-Care (Shower, Getting Ready, Daily Routine, etc.), Quiet Time (Reflection, Meditation, Journaling, etc.), Education and Commuting. Feel free to add any other categories not mentioned.
  2. # of Hours — Here, list the total estimated hours your spend per week doing each of the corresponding activities.
  3. % of time — Each cell should contain a calculation of the # of hours spent on specific activity, divided by the total weekly expenditure of hours, expressed as a percentage.

Begin listing how your time is currently spent each week. Your Total Weekly Expenditure should equal 168 hours and 100% of your allocated time. Now turn this data into a labelled pie chart so that you can visualize your week.

The more you work, the less time you have to spend on other activities, especially time with others or leisure. The amount and quality of downtime time is important for your well-being (both physical and mental). In visualizing your time as Bavaro has suggested, you might notice several patterns and dependancies.

You might realize that you’re feeling stressed not only because you aren’t sleeping enough, but you aren’t factoring exercise into your weekly routine. You might notice that some of your leisure time is contaminated (ie. it’s not spent distraction/work-free due to mobile technology).

It would be wise to resist the paradox of productivity: do not fill your free time with more work. 

In fact, your capacity for creativity depends on lulls in your schedule. Are you making enough time for vacation? Are you making enough time for sleep? Are you making enough time to be bored? According to David Burkus, author of The Myths of Creativity: The Truth About How Innovative Companies and People Generate Great Ideas:

Boredom boosts creativity because of how people prefer to alleviate it. Boredom, they suggest, motivates people to approach new and rewarding activities. In other words, an idle mind will seek a toy. (Anyone who has taken a long car ride with a young child has surely experienced some version of this phenomenon.)

In a study of 1,000 U.S. professionals, 94% said they work 50 or more hours a week, with nearly half that group putting in more than 65 hours a week. And that doesn’t include the 20-25 hours/week most of them spend monitoring their phones while outside the office. If aren’t auditing how we spend our most valuable resource, our time, who else will? Nobody ever dies saying “I wish I’d spent more time at the office.”

[via]

Further Reading: Why Is Everyone So Busy?

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Venice Art Biennale 2015: All the World’s Futures. Part 2: Arsenale

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This is part two of our coverage of the 56th International Art Exhibition – Venice Art Biennale 2015. Following the walk-through of the exhibition in the Central Pavilion in the Giardini, we now have a look at the artworks in the Arsenale. In the Arsenale, the Biennale presents works by artists such as Bruce Nauman, Philippe Parreno, Adel Abdessemed, Daniel Boyd, Katharina Grosse, Lili Reynaud Dewar, Chris Ofili, The Propeller Group, Cao Fei, Peter Friedl, Georg Baselitz, and Rirkrit Tiravanija.

Venice Art Biennale 2015: All the World’s Futures, Arsenale. Exhibition walkthrough, May 6 and 7, 2015.

> Right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) this link to download Quicktime video file.
> On YouTube:

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Sotheby’s London To Offer One of The Most Important Paintings by Kazimir Malevich Ever To Appear At Auction

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Sotheby’s London To Offer One of The Most Important Paintings by Kazimir Malevich Ever To Appear At Auction

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Peter Kennard review – a thrillingly grotesque montage of modern times

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Imperial War Museum, London
A gas-masked globe, a skeleton with a mushroom-cloud head … this new exhibition of Kennard’s violent political cut-ups is brave, brazen – and shows the truth behind the bright shining lies of war

War is an infernal engine of art. In the 20th century, it caused artists to lose all faith in form, beauty – those old civilised lies that sent young men to die. In 1916 in Zurich, as a generation went to its slaughter, the Cabaret Voltaire was founded and Dada began – a furious attack on meaning and coherence. In Berlin at the end of the first world war, this movement gave rise to shocking cut-up images of faces, bodies and society blown into fragments. The collages of George Grosz, Hannah Höch and John Heartfield are the counterblast to all the patriotic posters of the great war – and to 21st-century attempts to sentimentalise its memory.

Peter Kennard is a living hero of pacifist photomontage. Not only has Kennard been denouncing war for more than four decades, but he does it using a style of photomontage directly descended from Höch’s Cut With the Kitchen Knife Through the Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch of Germany and Heartfield’s Adolf, the Superman, Swallows Gold and Spouts Crap.

Related: Protest and survive: why Peter Kennard is political dynamite

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Sotheby’s To Sell One of Vilhelm Hammershøi’s Most Beguiling Interiors

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Sotheby’s To Sell One of Vilhelm Hammershøi’s Most Beguiling Interiors

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A Game of Norway

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mapsmania.jpg

On May 17th Norway celebrates its Constitution Day. This national holiday celebrates the signing of the Constitution of Norway at Eidsvoll on May 17th 1814. The constitution declared Norway to be an independent kingdom in an attempt to avoid being ceded to Sweden after Denmark–Norway’s devastating defeat in the Napoleonic Wars.

Last year, to mark the 200th anniversary of the signing of the

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