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  • #NowPlaying ♫ Ten Love Songs – Susanne Sundfør http://t.co/PWx2sbIQUe
  • Why anyone bothers to attempt to cover “Love will tear us apart” is beyond me. You have nothing to add, nothing to contribute.
  • “Unknown Pleasures” CD pressing from 1992, by “New Dawn Fades” (clearly Joy Division listened to Magazine) it’s starting to sound OK.
  • Can’t get to my vinyl (around 300 Face and Arena mags makes trendy 80s barrier) can tell you “Unknown Pleasures” does not sound right on CD
  • Joy Division: http://t.co/PWN1QlRuWl via 4*. Not much you haven’t seen, but still touching and Genesis P Orridge shows soft side
  • “I suppose you could say it was Norwegian organised crime, two men and a ladder”. Art detective Charles Hill on the 1994 “Scream” heist.

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  • #nowreading “In a Free State: A Novel” [but reads like a collection of short stories] VS Naipul and Fernando Pessoa’s “Book of Disquiet”.
  • http://t.co/fMeFMEJSIM “My Struggle…don’t let it become yours”, 1* Knausgaard gets what his writing deserves
  • … and we are back. ty
  • #12181806

Bartender

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Bartender:

The menu bar in OS X is extremely useful, but often abused. Many, many apps drop an icon into the menu bar which causes this long, ugly list of icons cluttering up the top of your screen. Step one is to remove those you don’t need, but the second step is to install Bartender.

Bartender helps you clean up and organize your menu bar items into critical (always visible) and non-critical (hidden in the Bartender menu), while keeping hidden items still available for use behind a single click. For me, CloudApp, Dropbox, Fantastical and the time are all I need to see regularly. Everything else gets hidden in the Bartender menu.

Any time I set up a new Mac, Bartender is one of the first utilities I install.

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Sandra Kolstad – Zero Gravity State of Mind

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The third record from Norwegian artist Sandra Kolstad finds her quietly evolving into one of our most important makers of electronic pop music.

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user48736353001 Releases More Tracks

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user48736353001, aka Aphex Twin (Richard D. James), has released more tracks on SoundCloud, bring the total number of tracks available to download to over 170.  In recent interviews, James has discussed how he has a huge backlog of material that … Continue reading

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MP3 At 3PM: American Culture

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American Culture is keeping american culture alive by living out in the desert at four corners (where Arizona, Colorado, Utah and New Mexico meet) and playing a dreamy brand of blissful punk and pop. Now the band offers a new track called “I Wanna Be Your Animal” for free download. The song starts out with […]

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Nine Zones In London Earmarked For Housing Boost

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housingzones

If you’re in certain areas of London, you’re about to see a lot of building. Mayor Boris Johnson has announced the first nine housing zones which will get City Hall funds to improve various infrastructure to make sites more appealing — and viable — for building more houses. Which we all know London needs more of.

£260m will go towards things like a new Overground station at New Bermondsey (formerly known as Surrey Canal), improvements to the area around the new Southall Crossrail station and other station upgrades, five new schools, four new bridges, two new civic centres, a football pitch, shops, restaurants and libraries. This kind of work often needs to be done upfront to unlock an area’s potential, but funding tends to come from things like Section 106 payments and community infrastructure levies — and that money comes from developers. Who won’t come unless an area is worth building in. Catch 22.

With plans for infrastructure in place, the hope is that 28,000 new homes will be fast tracked — 9,000 of which will be ‘affordable’ (and here we insert our customary warning that ‘affordable’ doesn’t necessarily mean what you think it does). The zones will keep their designation until 2025 and are between Abbey Wood station and Southmere Lake; Abbey Wood, Plumstead and Thamesmead (a development with Peabody Trust); Barking town centre; between Clapham Junction and Battersea riverside; Harrow, Wealdstone and Hounslow town centres; New Bermondsey; Southall; and Tottenham. Another 20 housing zones are expected to be announced later in the year.

In other housing news, if you fancy building your own home there’s £5m available in City Hall’s budget to help you out. It’s expected to help subsidise construction costs of around 150 new properties (that’s about £33k per home) on redundant commercial land. Conservative Assembly Member Gareth Bacon says it’s possible to build an energy efficient home for around £50k — though what stops most self-builders is the eye-watering cost of land in this city.

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Folding shutters create varying levels of privacy for Porto townhouse

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Bright white shutters concertina across the glazed facade of this Porto home designed and occupied by local architects Cláudia Monteiro and Vitor Oliveira. (more…)

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WPTavern: Aventurine: A Free WordPress Theme Featuring Bold Typography and Bright Colors

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Last year, WordPress saw a renaissance in personal blogging themes. The official WordPress.org directory received a deluge of high quality themes that served to raise the bar for commercial developers when it comes to design and simplicity.

In particular, the trend of flat, minimalist blogging themes is still running strong. Last month, theme design and development duo Mel Choyce and Kelly Dwan released Aventurine, a bold new theme for writers.

The name Aventurine was inspired by the Italian phrase a ventura, meaning by chance, but the theme’s elegant and deliberate typography choices indicate that nothing has been left to chance. Aventurine posseses a design wholeness where every element has a clear purpose, and the theme is free of cluttersome widgets and extraneous meta.

aventurine

The theme’s colors are reminiscent of Choyce and Dwan’s popular Flounder theme, which has been downloaded more than 33,000 times. Aventurine’s text and headers feature Josefin Sans and Varela Round from Google Fonts.

The theme includes customizer options for setting the background and header colors. You can also upload a background image. Aventurine’s creators recommend using a repeating pattern, such as the ones offered at subtlepatterns.com.

aventurine-customizer

Featured images are displayed as headers on top of posts at 900px wide for impact. The footer widget areas the only additional customizable feature. They are displayed neatly beneath posts and do not detract from the main content of the page.

Dwan and Choyce built Aventurine with accessibility in mind, particularly as it relates to best practices for interacting with keyboard and screen readers. While the theme’s default color palette does not pass accessibility guidelines, the authors made it easy for you to change some of the theme’s main colors in the customizer. Further customizations can be added to a child theme.

Aventurine has built-in support for a range of Jetpack features, including galleries, carousels, infinite scroll, and Photon. Over the past year, the Jetpack development team has been refining the plugin’s features to be more friendly to theme developers. Many newly released themes are taking advantage of this by supporting Jetpack features out of the box.

After sorting through dozens of free themes added to WordPress.org in early 2015, Aventurine is one of the few that stand out as truly original and inspiring. It’s one of the best-designed personal blogging themes of 2015 thus far. Check out the live demo on the theme’s homepage. You can download Aventurine for free from WordPress.org or install it via your admin themes browser.

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House H by OZ Arq

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Constructed entirely from concrete and steel, the OZ Arq built House H embodies a very modern preoccupation with privacy. Located on the outskirts of Lima, Peru, the house faces away from what would normally be considered the front of the building. The enormous bay windows open out onto a view of the plot’s lush landscape instead – a view that is capped off by an outdoor pool. At three floors, one of which lies underground, House H still manages to retain a low profile, due to width of its silhouette.

The post House H by OZ Arq appeared first on Highsnobiety.

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  • Peter Perrett - Hebden Bridge Trades Club – live review - http://t.co/H2ScuWvEWQ - the only UK show for The Only Ones legend
  • ‘It will be a world of ‘billionaires and beggars”’ and ‘Average is over’. Economist Tyler Cowen on death of the middle class and rise of AI.
  • In short: semi-skilled manual work is future proof, highly skilled job (law and accounting) are not
  • “high-level reasoning requires very little computation, but low-level sensorimotor skills require enormous computational resources.”
  • Moravec’s paradox http://t.co/TgZCDqjCMK
  • “provocation, propaganda, prevarication [lies]” - the 3Ps Putin use to outmanoeuvre the West according to Amanda Foreman in the Sunday Times
  • Genalto (hacked SIM-makers) “supplies digital passport services to the US government” (FT). So can British spies create fake US e-passports?

Modernist EstatesThe buildings and the people who live in them…

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Modernist Estates
The buildings and the people who live in them today
Available on pre-order

I’m not that superstitious, actually scrap that, I am really superstitious, so it feels a little premature to be saying ‘ta-dah, here it is everyone!’ when in reality it’s not gone to print yet. But I’m oh so almost there, and with my self-promotional hat on, I wanted to let you know the book I have been busy working on (based on the Modernist Lives feature I started on this blog) is now available to pre-order.

It will feature 21 profiles on modernist estates and their residents, including the Isokon, Barbican, Byker and Park Hill. Some brilliant archival images (they always look great in black and white and without modern cars) alongside some images by me. For which you will have to be forgiving. This has not been an exercise in interior styling, but an honest snap shot of people’s homes and how they inhabit them. Saying that, they are all pretty covetable to be honest.

What else, there’s also a bit of text about the history of each estate, the architects and the politics of the time, and now. Oh, and a brilliant introductory essay by architecture critic Douglas Murphy. 

The book is published by Frances Lincoln, who have been absolutely excellent and supportive on the project. It’s priced at £25, it will be released in September, but Amazon are taking pre-orders here

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  • - why have you closed Case #11662877. I still can’t log in via a standard web session or using IOS. Didn’t even received a response
  • http://t.co/V6a8c1KGuU Bosch S01 - glossy run-of-the-mill detective drama with ex-special forces cop vs serial killer. 3*

Ocean Deck House by Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects

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Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects aimed at reversing the norm when designing the Ocean Deck House. Constructing it to be “upside down,” the most spectacular views reside via the living, dining and kitchen areas on the top floor. The first floor of this ocean front home paves the way for a luxurious mixed wood and concrete patio, a pool, outdoor fireplace and covered ping pong area. Lower level entry is enclosed by both glass and concrete, as this floor plays home to much of the storage space in the house.

The second floor acts as the main floor, featuring each of the bedrooms and one central family room. This level is accessed via an exterior stair entrance. The third floor, again provides for the most magnificent views, with it facing southward. Here you will find the main deck which is privy to outdoor cooking, entertaining, lounging and even gardening.

The post Ocean Deck House by Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects appeared first on Highsnobiety.

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Coming soon: Modernist Estates: The buildings and the people who live in them by Stefi Orazi

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Modernist Estates: The buildings and the people who live in them by Stefi Orazi
Modernist Estates: The buildings and the people who live in them by Stefi Orazi

Not content with doing some wonderful art, Stefi Orazi has now turned her attention to books, specifically with Modernist Estates: The buildings and the people who live in them, which is published by Frances Lincoln.

The book isn’t out for a while, but it is available to pre-order now. So if you are the organised type, this is very much for you.

As for the book, that covers 192 pages and is described as ‘inside look at remarkable and sometimes controversial estates in Britain and their impact on the lives of their communities’.

21 modernist estates (and residents of each) are covered, including iconic builds like the Barbican, the Isokon, Balfron Tower and Park Hill. For each one, you’ll get an overview of the building, architects, historical and political context, along with interviews and contemporary photography, plus an insight into what it’s like to live on a modernist estate today.

The book is published on 3rd September 2015, but is available to order now, selling for £25 in hardback.

Find out more at the Amazon website

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The Pierre House by Olson Kundig Architects

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Perché sur une paroi rocheuse dans les superbes îles San Juan aux États-Unis, ce projet architectural réalisé par Tom Kundig des Olson Kundig Architectes est aussi fascinant que son paysage environnant. Intitulée « The Pierre » en référence au mot français, la bâtisse est principalement faite d’acier, de béton lisse et de placoplâtre.

The Pierre House by Olson Kundig Architects_12
The Pierre House by Olson Kundig Architects_11
The Pierre House by Olson Kundig Architects_10
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The Pierre House by Olson Kundig Architects_8
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The Pierre House by Olson Kundig Architects_4
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The Pierre House by Olson Kundig Architects_2
The Pierre House by Olson Kundig Architects_1
The Pierre House by Olson Kundig Architects_0

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Vikings were pioneers of craft and international trade, not just pillaging

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“Yes it’s a new thing we’re trying out, it’s called ‘international trade’.” Anna Gowthorpe/PA

The connections between technology, urban trading, and international economics which have come to define modern living are nothing new. Back in the first millennium AD, the Vikings were expert at exploring these very issues.

While the Vikings are gone their legacy is remembered, such as at the annual Jorvik Viking Festival in York. The Norsemen’s military prowess and exploration are more often the focus of study, but of course the vikings were more than just bloodthirsty pirates: they were also settlers, landholders, farmers, politicians, and merchants.

Between the 8th and 11th century (the Viking Age), Europe saw significant technological advances, not all of them Scandinavian – the Anglo-Saxons, Frisians and Franks were equal players. To understand these changes, we have to see them in the context of increasing contact between Scandinavia, the British Isles, and continental Europe – in which the Vikings were key players. Technological innovations such as the potter’s wheel and the vertical loom transformed not only the types of products being manufactured in Viking settlements, but also the scale on which they were produced.

Technological developments emerged as people came together in growing coastal trading centres and market towns. The world was rapidly becoming more joined-up during this period than at any time since the heyday of the Roman Empire. Trade fostered international links across the North Sea, Baltic and beyond, and similar developments were happening as far afield as the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. This was a period in which people began to live and work in entirely new ways, and technological change was both a cause and an effect of this.

While many Viking artefacts of the period are familiar, the complex methods that lay behind their manufacture are less well-known. Each involved a specialised set of skills, tools and raw materials, which meant craftspeople were reliant not only on a market for sale, but also on a well-organised supply chain. This is why the development of specialist crafts, of growing urbanisation, and of long-distance trade are intimately connected.

The Vikings were expert shipbuilders and navigators, and while evidence for their shipwrights’ skills survives to the present day, there is little detail of how they navigated their huge journeys. What is clear is that between the 8th and 11th century, viking shipping underwent significant development, beginning with the appearance of the sail, and leading to the development not only of specialist warships, but also of prototypes for the large cargo vessels that would come to dominate the waters of later medieval Europe. But Viking technology had more to offer than ships and swords.

Viking brooches were ornate, beautiful, and mass-produced.
British Museum

Brooches

Among the most recognisable Viking artefacts are their brooches. Long studied by archaeologists, they signified gender, status, and ethnicity. Work is ongoing to reveal the advanced technology used in their manufacture.

Evidence for brooch manufacture in Viking towns includes the remains of moulds and crucibles. The crucibles are often found complete with residues of the metals melted down in them. Brooches were cast by pouring this metal into moulds, which were produced by pressing existing pieces of jewellery or lead models into clay, followed by minor artistic modification. This resulted in a sort of mass-production. As this craft was dependent on high-quality brass ingots from continental Europe, specialist jewellery production centres arose at ports associated with long-distance trade routes.

Glass bead jewellery

Strings of ornate glass beads are another common sight in Viking museum displays. Beads were made in Scandinavian towns by carefully manipulating coloured glass as it melted. Waste deposits prove that the raw glass used in this process came in the form of coloured tesserae: small, square blocks from the Mediterranean, where they were used to produce mosaics. Whether they were bought and sold in south-eastern Europe, before travelling west, or whether they were ripped from Byzantine churches on raids in the region is unclear.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rvXiT9ZR9M?wmode=transparent&start=0&w=440&h=260

Combmaking

Animal bones were among the most important materials in pre-modern technology: a durable, flexible, readily available raw material used for everything from knife handles to ice skates. Many such objects could be made quickly, with little training – but not the Vikings’ hair combs.

These large, ornate, over-engineered objects took days to manufacture and required a trained hand. Specialised tools such as saws, rasps, and polishers were needed, and deer antler particularly was the material of choice.

Viking combs ranged from the practical to the ornate.
British Museum

Combs of this type go back to the Late Roman period, but they really came into their own in the Viking Age, where they became a symbol of status and aspiration. Combmakers tended to work in towns, where they had access to periodic markets and a supply network that brought in deer antler from the local countryside, and reindeer antler from the Arctic north. They may also have moved around from town to town, in order to maximise their sales. It’s a great example of the way town, countryside, and long-distance travel were tied together in order to support the technology that was important to the everyday life of Viking-Age people.

These examples of craftmanship and technical tool work – and there are many more – demonstrate that the Vikings should be seen as more than just raiders, and more more than simple traders or merchants too. With their outward-looking society and cutting edge techniques, they were among the earliest investors in global technologies in a post-Roman world that, even then, was increasingly international. And today, as a modern recreation of a Viking vessel embarks for the first ever Viking exhibition in China, it’s clear their appeal is truly global.

The Conversation

Steven Ashby has received funding from the AHRC, British Academy, and worked on a project funded by the Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF)

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UK government sets 2020 deadline to end replica furniture production

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Egg Chair replica

Business news: the UK government has finally set a deadline for the introduction of its new copyright protection law, making it illegal to manufacture or sell copies of design classics after 2020. (more…)

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Colorful Light Installations by Liz West

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Voici une sélection des dernières installations lumineuses réalisées par l’artiste britannique Liz West. Du design d’espace à la conception de sculptures, l’artiste imagine une expérience sensorielle où des dégradés de couleurs et de lumières vives imprègnent l’espace par d’intenses jeux de reflets. À découvrir en images.

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Colorful Light Installations by Liz West-8
Colorful Light Installations by Liz West-7
Colorful Light Installations by Liz West-6b
Colorful Light Installations by Liz West-6
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Colorful Light Installations by Liz West-4
Colorful Light Installations by Liz West-3
Colorful Light Installations by Liz West-2
Colorful Light Installations by Liz West-1

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The 4 Digital artists to watch (and collect) #WTFisDigital

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Join Jenny Judova (founder of Art Map London) on a quest to figure out what the hell is digital art as she explores the digital art scene online, and offline in London. Digital/New Media artists to watch (and collect) There are rare moments in history of art when a new movement is born. To be […]

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WPTavern: Keep a CHANGELOG Project Aims to Standardize Best Practices for Writing Change Logs

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A change log is the quickest, most convenient way for users and contributors to identify significant changes in a project as it moves from one version to the next. The log exists to keep users informed.

Unfortunately, many open source project leaders have little motivation to provide a meaningful CHANGELOG file and are purely focused on shipping the code. Instead of writing clear, understandable logs for a release, many developers resort to dumping git logs, which are often rife with messy commit messages, into the CHANGELOG file.

Olivier Lacan, software engineer at Code School, has created a site and corresponding GitHub repository called Keep a CHANGELOG, with an extensive collection of recommendations for writing better change logs.

keep-a-changelog

The project page offers a variety of tips for improving change logs, i.e. how to list releases, recommended date format, sections and labels for classifying changes, and file naming convention.

One helpful tip Lacan offers, which isn’t commonly seen among even the finest, hand-crafted CHANGELOGs, is the recommendation for keeping an “Unreleased” section at the top. This helps users track for potential changes in progress for upcoming releases. Maintaining an “Unreleased” section minimizes the effort of writing the logs at release time, as you can easily add the version number to the section as changes are added and create a new Unreleased header.

Software Tools Are for People

Lacan makes a strong case for prioritizing the creation of a changelog for your open source project:

Why should I care? Because software tools are for people. If you don’t care, why are you contributing to open source?

He hopes that the Keep a CHANGELOG project will help to shape a better CHANGELOG file convention for all open source projects. Discussions and suggestions are welcome in the issues queue of the project’s GitHub repository. Contributors have already logged more than two dozen considerations.

WordPress.org offers some basic tips for improving change logs, but the official plugin directory doesn’t require developers to maintain a CHANGELOG file. Lacan’s Keep a CHANGELOG project is a complementary resource that can help WordPress developers and all open source project managers to write better logs for users and contributors.

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SOPHNET. Join British Brand Fox Umbrellas for Outerwear & Hat Collection

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Japan’s SOPHNET. pick up on the talents of classic British manufacturer Fox Umbrellas for a series of wet weather garments. With some serious years in business keeping folk dry (147, to be exact) and a resume that includes work for both the English and Japanese royal families, Fox prove their skills in a contemporary context with a jacket and hat model, offered in camo and navy colorways. Inspired by that timeless Mackintosh style, the jacket works with nylon ripstop fabric, rounded collar, rollaway hood and  a Riri zip sleeve pocket, perfect for that Oyster or Metro card. The bucket hats use the same lightweight nylon material, a brimmed structure to keep your head dry, available in the same camo and navy fabrics allowing you to match your lid to your jacket, if you’re that kind of guy.

The post SOPHNET. Join British Brand Fox Umbrellas for Outerwear & Hat Collection appeared first on Selectism.

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A First Look at ‘FLOAT,’ a Documentary About the World of Indoor Rubber-Powered Model Airplanes

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FLOAT is a documentary currently being filmed that explores the fascinating world of indoor rubber powered model airplanes – a hobby that is pursued by people from all walks of life and many countries around the world – and that has never been captured before in such remarkable detail. As part of the lead up to the film’s release, a preliminary vignette has been unveiled which captures the dream-like qualities of the airplane’s construction as well as introduces the viewer to Akihiro Danjo who over the last 15 years has set over eight World Records for flight duration. Current designs of these airplanes can fly for over 30 minutes on a single wound rubber motor, and the world record for time aloft is over one hour.

The post A First Look at ‘FLOAT,’ a Documentary About the World of Indoor Rubber-Powered Model Airplanes appeared first on Highsnobiety.

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  • My Amiga 1000 PAL version is up for sale at eBay. http://t.co/4odUeUS8P7?
    The first Amiga and predating successful Amiga 500

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Richard Long – Alan Christea Gallery, London

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Richard Long – The Spike Island Tapes
20 February – 2 April 2015
Alan Christea Gallery
31 & 34 Cork Street
London W1S 3NU
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a new series of 17 large carborundum prints made at Spike Island, Bristol
image invitation card
Richard Long – Fingers on Fire, 2014
A two panel carborundum relief printed in Crimson Red ink on Moulin du Gue 350 gsm paper, painted in a Cadmium Yellow acrylic wash, overall size 248,5 x 242,5 cm, edition of 7

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The #5 galleries in London you should visit if you are into New Media Art. #WTFisDigital

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Join Jenny Judova (founder of Art Map London) on a quest to figure out what the hell is digital art as she explores the digital art scene online, and offline in London.

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  • Who needs 100s of bookmarks? , and just saves everything I like to my WP tumblelog. Beautiful.
  • plugin for Chrome allows me to save a random web page to Inoreader, star it, delete the saved page. Starred -> > WordPress
  • So this is what a mid-life crisis looks like http://t.co/55uUiSfwjY Thanks for enlightening me

Nike Flyknit Shoes | Rosherun Black Dark Grey Shoes

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From £95.00 $120.62 127,85 € ¥17,206 $180.82 $185.69 £79.17 $120.62 106,55 € ¥14,339 $150.69 $154.75

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On the market: 1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA

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1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA

Not just a stunning house, it also has some celebrity pedigree too, as this 1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA is actually the home of US comedian Steve Martin.

1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA

Not that we are too concerned about the celebrity aspect. For us, it’s all about the house – and this is some house.

1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA

Modernist or brutalist, take your pick. Concrete is the certainly the star of the show in a house that works itself into a hill, with those green spaces (and the pool) a stark contrast to the main living space.

1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA

The house sits in 5.86 acres of land, with the actual living area covering  7,377 square feet and including four bedrooms, 5.5 bathrooms and almost cavernous reception space. Check out the images, you get the idea.

1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA

Outside of the house you’ll find a winding drive, a large motor court and three-car garage, not to mention some external space for guests, which includes two bedrooms and a bathroom.

1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA

A celebrity house aimed very much at people with money to spare. You’ll need $10,999,500 spare to be the next owner of this.

Find out more at the Sotheby’s website

1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA
1970s Roland E. Coate Jr-designed modernist property in Santa Barbara, California, USA

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Ikea + Studioilse

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With the statement ”Home is the most important place in the world” Ikea announces a new and exciting collection developed in collaboration with the well known interior guru Ilse Crawford.

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  • World’s mega-rich Swiss tax-avoidance: Meet the HSBC IT bloke at the heart of damning leak http://t.co/WLPrDURwt5
  • “: Afghan Women in 1950 vs. 2013 http://t.co/ipjy6Y6Jcl”
  • Boxpark pop-up retail outlet set to come to East Croydon (good news, out goes CeX and the visitor centre). http://t.co/RzSJ2zqDmy
  • Qatar looking good for a long punt for top 8 in FIFA 2022. Expect to see top class players and Morinho or Guardiola as manager. Cash is king

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  • ‘Internet of things: Connect your TV, home, even your body, to the internet. But beware hackers’ or simply avoid it? http://t.co/LoaBq02TgQ
  • Samsung warns about ‘listening’ TV. Just don’t buy a telly that contains a microphone. If you do, expect trouble. http://t.co/k5pGran2zT
  • Turn the page and we are told that portrait of “future monarch shows us how lucky we are” and that ‘American Sniper’ is the bestselling book
  • while earning millions from some of the dodgiest regimes, but from here it looks like history is judging him less and less positive.
  • The review is by Michael Ignatieff (Harvard’s Kennedy School). Tony Blair still drones on about how history will judge him to be correct,
  • … their Taliban proxies,the Americans enlisted both the Saudis and Pakistanis as ALLIES” (my caps) Send in the prince and the peace envoy!
  • “Instead of pursuing the backers of 9/11 hijackers in Riyadh and Mecca, instead of forcing the Pakistani security to deliver up their …
  • From review of Patrick Cockburn’s book “The Rise of Islamic State” What do we do? Send gushing dignitaries praising Saudi regime as liberal.
  • “al-Qaeda might never have been able to … mutate into Isis if the US + allies had decided to go after its Saudi and Pakistani paymasters”
  • and De Palmas ‘Blow Out’ with Travolta and Nancy Allen (which I thought was quite a decent movie at the time)

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  • I’ll be putting up my Amiga 1000 for sale, the first Amiga and the computer that got Steve Jobs worried back in 1985: http://t.co/M72o7ZjKyq

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  • Bruce Sterling writing on virtual warfare. Nothing unusual, apart from that this is 1993 in ‘s premier issue. http://t.co/0jEhYOrtKt
  • We had a little water leak in our storage room forcing me to check storage boxes. Treasure: Wired mag premiere issue. http://t.co/AabmqqY745
  • Another storage box , this one containing The Face (‘84, 85). Profile of Sade Adu just after first single, Steve Wozniak, Cindy Sherman +++
  • Ardeur, Intégrale: de Alex Varenne http://t.co/cWuPXTgHwB via 60 euros for French re-issue 1 of 6 post-apocalyptic comic classic
  • Alex Varenne | Lambiek Comiclopedia: http://t.co/mg9WsInXqL
  • Times+ gives me 50 free photo prints every month, guess I should have discovered this earlier. http://t.co/AzervZx0lB
  • http://t.co/TADnFN7z70 “civilian casualty ratio in World War I is therefore approximately 2:3 or 40%”
  • good read, this is wrong on WWI? “the fact that the majority of people (90%) killed in the war were not soldiers”
  • Some thoughts on technology, weapons and the future from Vincent Emanuele
    http://t.co/NgvtlloEni http://t.co/ozOZK8L1w5
  • Grammarly Answers | Usage of shall and should http://t.co/TnnP4ZpYuB via I could have used ‘shall’ there.
  • Pondering upon whether I should get a cassette deck again? Seems like I can pick up a used one for 20-30 quid.
  • more cyber than punk, but hey nice photo.
  • I knew January had been drier than normal in London, just 38mm or so according to http://t.co/50dXAJ2UIn
  • Average monthly rainfall for January at Heathrow 1981-2010 is 55mm (http://t.co/sGrYD78qmx , last year we got 162mm (http://t.co/zq1KX9nxky)
  • arrest that gnome.
  • Authorities are desperate to go to the toilet?
  • and some work you did in the 80s, placed on page after Bryan Ferry interview in Arena no 6 (87). http://t.co/X6pRhy4Xmz
  • “I was always irritated by the detail, the way the suits were cut, the girls they cast, the cheap campness of it all” B Ferry on Bond movies
  • By the time Bryan Ferry was on the frontpage in issue 6 at the end of 1987 Arena magazine was (probably) established enough to remove it.
  • For the first 5 issues Arena carried a “From the publishers of The Face” above its masthead (US: nameplate). http://t.co/2fpoPCpEYy
  • here we are again.
  • Yeah, here it is https://t.co/dJ3ZSmmQkS Went through the pain of adding it all a couple of years ago, not sure I shared it.
  • Oil and Religion pt2. Adam Curtis: ‘Bitter Lake’: http://t.co/2JsQpZNj7Q 5*. Web exclusive for some reason (it’s not that long?)
  • OIl and Religion pt1. ‘There Will Be Blood’ (2007) - http://t.co/a4ZSzQwdeO Almost as good as they say. 4*
  • Corbijn (like Eno) seems to just work with celebrity now (2 of worst bands ever turn up), but the doc made me want to see The American again
  • Anton Corbijn Inside Out (2012) - http://t.co/pW3TEvSVNd Very good and quite intimate doc on and with Corbijn. 4*
  • Still need space, but something else will have to go.
  • just regret getting rid off them as I did when I sold year of Interview magazine for NOK500 (£50) back in the 90s. Needed space and money.
  • Back issues of Arena and The Face on eBay seems to be something between £2 and £20 depending on front cover etc. I’ll keep them or I’ll
  • Just opened a box from before lads mags ruined the world, here’s a bloke called from Arena No 21 (1990). http://t.co/h2ujArqehg
  • ‘OS X 10.10.3 Beta Adds Support for Google 2-Step Verification on Internet Accounts’ Excellent news. http://t.co/sC17aBWtkK
  • UKIP followed by Poundland and 99p stores on BBC News.

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  • Saudi blogger Raif Badawi due to be flogged tmrw. Wife says his health deteriorating, may not survive full punishment h…

Bjarne Melgaard explores beauty in modern society amidst a riot of colour and synthetic hair

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Around the borders of the preparatory sketches for Bjarne Melgaard’s latest show are annotations such as this one: ‘Woman lying around abstract boudoir in hair / pieces of hair / woman made out of hair’, or this: ‘Face made up of make-up products and smeared make-up and hair framing the canvas / bearded woman with two dogs in her eye’.

 

As wonderfully Surrealist as this sounds, it hardly prepares you for the impact of the realised works occupying Thaddaeus Ropac’s gallery in the Marais - perhaps because of the overwhelming application of synthetic hair, or maybe thanks to the riot of colour. Titled ‘The Casual Pleasure of Disappointment’, the 17 ballsy canvases, seven grotesque sculptures, seven additional patchwork dolls strewn flaccidly on knotted rope benches, and finally, one muppet in Melgaard’s likeness come together as an eruption of vibrant vulgarity.

The sexual narrative running through much of the series is largely owing to Melgaard’s fascination with Abuse of Weakness, a semi-autobiographical film from French director/writer Catherine Breillat. Seemingly portrayed as the artist’s protagonist (her name appears on several canvases), she’s often joined by lascivious, humanised dogs.

Perhaps unsurprisingly given the artist’s history of collaboration, the show is the combined effort of several talents, most notably, heavyweight hair stylist Bob Recine, who met Melgaard in October when they were working together on a fashion shoot. Once the two New Yorkers agreed to meld their creative output, they took turns adding to each work, completely trusting the other’s modifications. But who would have guessed that hair could be so expressive and versatile as a medium?

 

‘Every time I would come to the studio, there would be something new there,’ Melgaard told Wallpaper* days before yesterday’s opening as installation began. ‘There would be sketches and then a transfiguration of the sketch materialised - and with hair!’

 

Indeed, the custom-ordered hair cascades and puddles beyond the frames; it gets chopped, dyed and methodically arranged under resin; it acts as an outlining device tracing grotesque figures; and it curls around conventional, painted elements. Occasionally it even resembles an actual coif. And if you really think about it, what are brushes, if not a block of hair?

Meanwhile, make-up artist Kanako Takase worked simultaneously to rethink notions of applying make-up - whether as a sea of Chanel packaging (they estimate $25,000 worth of product) affixed to the canvas, or lipstick tubes disembodied and sculpted into new forms. The clothing, either functioning as an additional layer or as dress for the dolls, was designed by Andre Walker or Melgaard himself (one standout: the woven photo blanket ordered from Walmart that depicts the artist and his mother on a beach). Kwangho Lee contributed the seating - since the show requires more than a mere glimpse - and artist Susan Cianciolo pitched in as well.

‘It’s more extensive than the other ones,’ Melgaard said of this collaborative undertaking. ‘I think that my others always had more distance with them. This was much more organic. And also with the artwork, none of us knew what the result would be.’

 

But this fluidity invited Melgaard to consider ‘universal, existential, logical questions’ beyond the usual scope of his work. Or, as Recine put it, ‘This was a voyage into mystery and power and deception and disappointment of beauty. It is Bjarne’s inner understanding of beauty in a modern society. He went right to the source to creators like myself in the fashion world. He doesn’t manipulate or control anything; he just lets it happen. The only direction we had was a similar point of view and shared principles of technique.’

 

The new series coincides with an exhibition at the Munch Museum that positions Melgaard’s provocative style and subject matter in the context of Edvard Munch’s relevancy today. Beyond a then-and-now juxtaposition of Norwegian art, Melgaard admits the link, at least for him, can be tenuous at times. ‘His work is from another time, another world. On some levels, you connect to it; on some levels, you don’t.’

But even if the same could be said of this show, Recine joked that the output from such outsized personalities renders its title self-fulfilling. ‘I think when people come - and given what they’re expecting - disappointment is the only zenith of what you’re going to experience.’ Which, in effect, is what makes the art such a delight.

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Is it Better to be Smart or Beautiful?

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Which combination of qualities would you want for your children?

1. Average intelligence and beauty

2. High intelligence and average looks

In the United States, people my age were raised to value brains over beauty. But, as you know, my parents’ generation — the so-called Greatest Generation  were simpletons who didn’t know science from magic. Maybe we should go back and check some of their assumptions.

Let’s turn off our modesty filters for today so we don’t get tangled in our own false humility. I’ll go first. I’m smart, as far as I can tell, but no one would mistake me for attractive. So I know what it feels like to be smart and unattractive. I don’t have a sense of what it feels like to be attractive while having average intelligence, but frankly it looks like a better deal.

Science tells us that attractive people have a full range of benefits throughout life. They get better jobs, higher pay, more invitations, better sex partners, and a higher quality of life in general. Studies even say we judge attractive people to be smarter and more competent. And to the extent that beauty is a marker for good health, even the kids of attractive people have advantages.

Civilization is designed for people of average intelligence because they are the majority. Entertainment is focused on average people and so they have more opportunities for fun. User interfaces are designed so average people can use them, and so on. Average intelligence is a perfect fit for modern life because modern life is designed that way. 

Being attractive has its downsides, or so I hear. I assume attractive people have more stalkers and unwanted attention. And…that’s all the problems I can think of. Otherwise being attractive seems like a great deal.

Interestingly, few people have crossed over from one situation to the other and reported it. Intelligence doesn’t change that much and there is only so much you can do with your looks. We all have suspicions about what it is like to be in someone else’s situation, but without experiencing it you can never really know. 

In the past two years I got a whiff of the value of attractiveness. I had a personal shopper pick my clothes so I didn’t look so much like a victim of a fashion crime. I also transformed my body from an average-American body to a toned six-pack situation. I experienced (and this is anecdotal of course) a huge difference in how people treat me in person. I’m still short, bald, old and bespectacled, so there is a limit to how much I can improve. But even so, the benefits of perhaps 20% more attractiveness were substantial to my daily happiness even if it was all in my mind.

I also hear a lot of stories from spouse-free people now that I am one of them. The attractive spouse-free people have insanely interesting lives because they get amazing offers on a regular basis. When I was married I never heard any of their stories. Now that I am one of them, the spouse-frees open up to me. If you think attractive single people in 2015 are living the same lives as the rest of us, you are very, very, very, very wrong. That’s all I can tell you, and I had to leave out several “verys” for brevity.

Schools are organized to support the notion that brains are more important than looks. Most of the classes feed your brain and one or two are about fitness and health. I think science is awkwardly poised to suggest we should change the balance and focus a bit more on what I will call learned attractiveness. You can influence your attractiveness by exercise, nutrition, skin care, hair care, fashion, makeup, and more. And getting that stuff right is frankly more useful than getting an A+ in trigonometry, unless you plan on a technical career.

Personality is another factor you can tweak to improve your perceived attractiveness. Schools teach kids the rules of society but they don’t teach how to fix a broken personality. Adults end up in therapy to figure out how to deal with others. I didn’t know how to have a proper personal conversation until I was in my twenties and took the Dale Carnegie course. Personality is only partially genetic. A big part of it is technique, and technique can be taught.

I don’t think there is any hope that schools will offer beauty and personality classes as an alternative for kids who won’t benefit from learning trigonometry. But wouldn’t science support that strategy?

Scott Adams

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